Monday, June 26, 2017

Straight From the Mouth of Daniel A. Blum, Author of The Feet Say Run



Daniel A. Blum grew up in New York, attended Brandeis University and currently lives outside of Boston with his family. His first novel Lisa33 was published by Viking in 2003. He has been featured in Poets and Writers magazine, Publisher’s Weekly and most recently, interviewed in Psychology Today.

Daniel writes a humor blog, The Rotting Post, that has developed a loyal following.

His latest release is the literary novel, The Feet Say Run.

WEBSITE & SOCIAL LINKS:

WEBSITE | TWITTER | FACEBOOK



About the Book:

At the age of eighty-five, Hans Jaeger finds himself a castaway among a group of survivors on a deserted island.  What is my particular crime?  he asks.   Why have I been chosen  for this fate?  And so he begins his extraordinary chronicle. 

It would be an understatement to say he has lived a full life.  He has grown up in Nazi Germany and falls in love with Jewish girl.  He fights for the Germans on two continents, watches the Reich collapse spectacularly into occupation and starvation, and marries his former governess.  After the war he goes on wildflower expeditions in the Alps, finds solace among prostitutes while his wife lay in a coma, and marries a Brazilian chambermaid in order to receive a kidney from her. 

By turns sardonic and tragic and surreal, Hans’s story is the story of all of the insanity, irony and horror of the modern world itself.  

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble



Thanks for letting us interrogate you!  Can you give us a go-for-the-gut answer as to why you wanted to be an author?

I truly love the writing itself.  It is the most intriguing puzzle, the best brainteaser and the most intricate, joyous daydream, all rolled into one. 


Tell us (we won’t tell promise!) is it all it’s cracked up to be?  I mean what are the perks and what are the demands?

If it is cracked up to be lots of fascinating repartee with the intelligentsia, scandalous gossip at The Algonquin Club, not to mention several James Bond girls hanging on your every word, then no, it is not all it is cracked up to be.  Even with the success I have had, there have been plenty of frustrations – a glutted market, challenges of getting read and noticed, and dreaded time spent promoting oneself.  I truly weary of all of those, “Look what so-and-so said about how wonderful my book is” Facebook posts. 

On the other hand, the writing itself is a great pleasure, and producing  something that truly moves people, that makes them think, that people connect with – that is extremely satisfying. 


Which route did you take – traditional or self-published – and can you give us the nitty gritty low down on what’s that like?

My first novel, Lisa33, was with Viking, a very prestigious name in the industry.  And it was an awful experience, to be perfectly frank - a dream that gradually morphed into a nightmare.  This one, The Feet Say Run, is with a small press, Gabriel’s Horn. 


What’s the snarkiest thing you can say about the publishing industry (e.g. rejections, the long wait, etc.)

Yikes.  How much time do we have, and how many glasses of wine have I had?  For one, I truly don’t understand the judgments of the Ruling Class of opinion-makers.  I read lots of celebrated, literary fiction, lauded by critics, and so much of it is just plain tedious. Can’t anybody just say, “Nothing happened in this book!  Where was the story?”  Sometimes I feel editors and critics are just so many sheep.  One praises an author, anoints him or her as “the chosen one”, and everyone else, feeling secretly insecure in their own judgments, just falls in line.  

The Feet Say Run is mostly quite serious, but I also write a humor blog.  I grew so frustrated at bad writing by celebrated authors that I wrote pieces in the blog about the Worst Sentences in Modern Novels and the Worst Sex Scenes.  They were two of my most popular pieces.  Of course, they’re meant to be fun but there is a serious element to it:  if we are unable to critize and demand the most from ourselves, from one another, then literature is in trouble. 


Tell us for real what your family feels about you spending so much time getting your book written, polished, edited, formatted, published, what have you?

I would say they’re all supportive.  My wife is my toughest critic, but it has made me a better writer.  When she was really enthusiastic about The Feet Say Run it was definitely a good sign. 


What was the craziest or insane thing that happened to you in the book publishing process?

That would be with my first novel, Lisa33.  My agent, Bill Clegg, managed to get a bidding war going for it, and I got a very big advance from Viking.  After years of rejections, this was all completely surreal to me.  “You’re going to be famous,” Bill assured me.  Yet after that, everything went wrong.  I won’t go into all the details, but it was ultimately deep-sixed.  Buried by the publisher, not promoted at all.  And Bill himself mysteriously disappeared just when the book was coming out.  

All things must pass, and that definitely includes my advance, which I spent through in the next year.  So I found myself back at my day-job.  One day I was sitting in a cubicle, reading the New York Times, and there was my old agent, Bill Clegg, on the front page.  He had just published his own memoir.  He’d descended, evidently, into cocaine addiction, had left his authors stranded and bad left the literary world entirely.  And now he had returned - this agent who had assured me I would be famous – and was himself basking in fame and success.  In his memoir he actually wrote about how he’d left his writers stranded.  And there I was, one of his writers, feeling very stranded indeed, reading about his book, his redemption and glory, from my anonymous cubicle. 

To be honest, I stopped writing and even reading fiction for a couple of years after that.  But of course, life must go on. 


How about the social networks?  Which ones do you believe help and which ones do you wish you could avoid?

I suppose Facebook is the behemoth, and it is definitely useful.  But I am very ambivalent about it.  I started my blog to promote my fiction, and then got on facebook to post links to the blog, and then got on twitter to tweet about my facebook posts.  Its an infinite loop, a whirlpool, and feels like art and beauty are getting sucked right into its vortex. 


Book sales.  Don’t you just love them (or lack of?)?  How are you making the sales happen for you?

I have absolutely refused to look.  I don’t want to know.  I’m enjoying that so many friends and book group readers have loved the book.  I’m sure if it really starts to take off I’ll know.  Thankfully, this time around, my expectations are a good deal more grounded.  Eventually, I’ll get a royalty statement from my publisher, so I’ll deal with it then. 


What is one thing you’d like to jump on the rooftop and scream about?

Hmm…it might be to complain about, “The Dying Animal,” by Philip Roth.  This novel is a perfect example of mindless critics raving about a truly horrible book. And it is also an example of a writer suffering from way too much praise, believing that whatever he writes must be a work of genius by definiton.  Roth has written some fine books and some awful ones.  This was definitely in the latter camp.  Or maybe if you have a breast fetish, it’s a work of ineffable genius.  Who knows?    


Okay, too much sugar for you today!  Here’s a nice cup of Chamomile tea and come on over and sit under the cabana and watch the waves roll in.  Now…can you tell us what you love about being a published author and how all those things above doesn’t matter because it’s all part of the whole scheme of things and you wouldn’t have it any other way?

Haha.  I think I would need something stronger than tea to believe that I “wouldn’t have it any other way”.  We all have our regrets, after all.  But I will say this:  I still truly love writing and reading - in spite of how I may sound.  I just read, My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante and it is everything a novel should be.  I can’t say enough good things about it.  What’s more, I truly enjoy talking about books – whether seriously or snarkily.  Most importantly, I’m really proud of The Feet Say Run.  I want to write a literary novel with passion and suspense and a real, compelling plot - in short, to write the book I would most want to read.  So many people tell me the book is really hard to put down, which makes me feel that on some level at least, I have succeeded.  And that is incredibly gratifying.  


Thursday, June 22, 2017

Straight from the Mouth of Children's Author Anne K. Edwards

Anne K. Edwards’ two new children’s books were just published on Amazon Kindle. They are titled Dominick and the Dragon which is the first of a series and Changing Places is based on actual characters. The books are self-published and available only on Amazon Kindle or PDF from the author.

Questionnaire:

Q.  Thanks for letting us interrogate you!  Can you give us a go-for-the-gut answer as to why you wanted to be an author?

A.  Reading from very early childhood fed a hunger based in loneliness. It made me want to write like the authors I admired. My first efforts came about in the third grade. At that time I was reading books ahead of my age and the horse stories by Walter Farley and books like My Friend Flicka started it all. 

I was in love with horses and wanted one. That was something that wasn’t going to happen so I gathered a herd of my own.  Of course, they were all sticks and each had a name. I had four stallions and four mares, two of each color. Black stallions and mares were my favorites due to the excitement found in Mr. Farley’s Black Stallion series.  My horses were all wild and I was the only one who could ride them. The sad part of my story about this lovely band was that some days I’d come home from school and find my largest horse standing on his head much reduced in status. My mother liked to cull my herd of eight, claiming one to become her new clothesline prop whenever an old one broke from being out in the weather and could no long bear the load of a full line. So I would replace it (usually my favorite black stallion) with another and go on as before.  I rode the stick horses until I finally outgrew living my adventures with my little brother. But, oh, what lovely times we had until then.



It was during this period that I began to live my adventures in my imagination and this led me to putting them down on paper, too. When my herd had moved on to greener pastures and my mother became the happy owner of a new clothes dryer, she lost her status as a horse thief. I can still remember those times and can relive them if I just close my eyes and let time flow backward. 

Of course, internalizing my adventures brought change with it, especially the urge to write and by age eleven I was trying my hand at short horse stories and sending them off to the important magazines of the day. And, no, you’d never have seen my name published in those days, but I loved the dream and hope that came with it. Every budding author should know that feeling. It feeds our souls. 

Q.  Tell us (we won’t tell promise!) is it all it’s cracked up to be?  I mean what are the perks and what are the demands? 

A.  Absolutely, learning to write and the search for publication is all it’s cracked up to be, both the hard times and good times. It is an adventure in itself. The need for self-expression can strike at any age and demands some sort of satisfaction. Writing books in any genre grants me that.

I don’t know if there are really any perks for the average writer of today unless it is that we are forced to learn by doing. We must do most or all of our own promotion, try to fit the writing in with family, the house and other demands we have gladly added to our lives. That said, if you like hard work and the great pleasure of sending something you’ve written to a publisher or doing the publishing yourself, then you have the best job in the world and little compares to that perk. There is no other feeling in the world like the one we experience when our work comes to fruition.



The demands of being an author are usually the same for every writer. We must become almost hermit-like when writing, a life dedicated to solitude and full focus on our work.  If we allow distractions of any sort while we struggle to write, we become part-time writers or hobbyists. This means we must make choices and perhaps divide our time into chunks, one for each part of our life. Added to that is much of our time is spent fruitlessly in chasing our dream. We must discipline ourselves to accept that fact and realize it is part of our education as a writer. We must study and read, seek out like-minded people and learn from their experiences. The biggest demand, and it is the one that hurts the most, is when something we’ve put our heart and soul into is rejected over and over, and we finally come to understand that what we’ve produced just doesn’t work as an article or story. We may have rewritten it ten times or more and still find it is flawed in some way, lacking something we just can’t see. Thus, we must humble our pride of having written and learn acceptance.  That is a huge part of a writer’s education. A writer must be prepared to keep learning as long as they write. 

Q.  Which route did you take –- traditional or self-published -– and can you give us the nitty gritty low down on what’s that like?

A.  I have taken both routes and find I really prefer the traditional-—that means having the security of a publisher to guide your work through the publishing process into ebook or print. Self-publishing is something I still think has a ways to go before I can find true success in it so I self-publish only that of my work that I know doesn’t fit publishers’ guidelines for the genre or an agent’s preference. Too often, I have submitted after receiving an email saying they’d be glad to read my book only to learn I’ve wasted my time. The favorite reason for rejection in those instances, I’ve found is, it doesn’t fit their guidelines, a statement that covers everything.

My two children’s books are self-published because they are too short for the standard children’s book and are basically meant to show children after a certain age can think for themselves in many situations and, hopefully, the stories also entertain. Knowing this, I don’t waste any time seeking a publisher because their guidelines don’t fit my story.

I learned the hard way anyone seeking publication of their work must be prepared to waste time. It can be that an author will be told by an agent to rewrite their work and resubmit. If the author takes the time to do this before they have a contract, they will find to their dismay that many times that agent has already left her job for parts unknown and no other agent working with her will add them to their own workload.  Or the same agent may decide that the rewrite isn’t what they want after all and drop the project.  So one must consider well the use of time spent in having an agent while said writer is new to the writing game.  Trying to gain acceptance by established agents usually comes to naught for various reasons and going to an agent no one has heard of, but who advertises widely for new clients, will prove a waste of time when one learns that same agent is only building a list of names of wannabe writers whose work they rarely put time into promoting.  The disappointments these agents cause writers are that most of the time they don’t tell you, you are just one of too many, they don’t inform their clients when they move on, or they never show the clients’ work to a publisher. Those same agents often say don’t call and remain incommunicado to authors and/or they may take as long as six months or more to look at the author’s work, if they do. They don’t like to waste their own time but have no compunction about wasting that of a writer. They can actually discourage a budding author by this treatment.

There are some fine agents but the writer must be very lucky to get an appointment with them or a recommendation by one of their clients. They are an overworked bunch when one considers the number of them to the multitude of us who want to be writers. The lesson I learned here was to ignore the disappointment and keep on writing.  Luckily, I found I didn’t need an agent as the Internet made it possible to find a publisher and I have been very satisfied there.  There are some parts of chasing success that can devour one’s whole life so a writer must decide how much time they want to devote to searching for an agent and success with a print publisher or saving that time to contact the small presses and find an opportunity for publication.  Once published that way, many authors go on to realize their dream of acceptance by a large press.  We must ask ourselves if the Internet is a step to the latter goal or will we be happy with it as our resting place. 

Q.  Tell us for real what your family feels about you spending so much time getting your book written, polished, edited, formatted, published, what have you?

A.  My husband doesn’t mind my filling my time with writing as he considers it a productive hobby, but my furry children (no, not werewolves) known as cats show me as strongly as they can that they object. They sleep on the keyboard to show me it’s in use. They delete or add letters to a manuscript at the same time. Many times I’ve found added or deleted pages. They feel they have to teach me how to do things right also. If I get up from the typing table and take a break, one cat will hit the ‘off’ button.  So I have learned to save my work. They think writing takes my attention from them, something they dislike intensely and I think they blame the machine. Sleeping on the keyboard, using it a scratching post, knocking the router and mouse about are some of their steps to revenge. 

Q.  This is for pet lovers.  If you don’t own a pet, skip this question, but do your pets actually get their food on time or do they have to wait until you type just one more word?

A.  I have several pets and they do not wait for me to stop and tend their wants.  To get my attention, they start fights, pick on the littler ones, yowl for no reason, claw my clothes, jump in my lap and make sure one foot comes down on the keyboard. And that is only some of their tricks.  It is better to feed them and then continue.  It is also a useful survival technique. 

Q.  In writing your book, how did you deal with the phone ringing, your family needing dinner or your boss calling you saying you’re late?

A.  This is an easy one to answer.  I keep the phone turned off. My family members are adults who eat at different times and we make our own meals.  I am retired and the cats are my bosses as I said in the previous answer.

Q.  What was the craziest or insane thing that happened to you in the book publishing process?

A.  The US Mail losing two manuscripts in a month is about as close as I can come to an answer here.  This was in the days when things were typed on a manual or electric typewriter and lost manuscripts had to be retyped if lost.  You could not send carbon copies to an agent or a publisher. I usually produce a book of about 300 pages so one might say they helped fill my time and kept me from doing anything new.  When the email was made available, I was only too happy to sign on to use it.  Of course, there were the times when our server would cut off in the middle of sending and it had to be resent, but that is only a few minutes lost at most. This is one of the things that will drive a writer over the wall so it only proves one has to be slightly crazy anyhow to be a writer. 

Q.  How about the social networks?  Which ones do you believe help and which ones do you wish you could avoid?

A.  To be honest, I find the social networks are not much use.  I’ve tried several of them and was left wondering why I bothered. I didn’t try to sell books on those I did sign onto, but I got a huge increase in junk email and now have to spend too much time deleting. 


Q.  Book sales.  Don’t you just love them (or lack of?)?  How are you making the sales happen for you?

A.  Book sales and book fairs are a mixed bag. They charge fees for a spot at one of their tables which one might consider fair. However, often they have well known authors in attendance who they put at the front tables, and the lesser or unknowns in the rear and the tables are often set up so the visitors can’t reach them. I came to the conclusion this was a way to funnel visitors where they’d spend the most money and less time. Some events call themselves book sales and invite all authors to be part of it. But their purpose is to sell used books from libraries or other such sources and the authors are merely an additional draw to get a larger turnout. Here too, visitors are funneled in specific directions and the visiting authors are ignored.  I’ve been fortunate to be invited to meet readers at some Brick and Mortar stores and found them to be the most productive. The best one I attended was where I sold several copies of a book and spoke to a group in a mix of questions and answers. This gave me the chance to as questions as well as provide answers to others.  Readers can teach an author. Out in the world there must be other types of book sales, and someday I hope to find them. Face-to-face meetings with the readers are a lot of fun if you can talk.  One other comment, I’ve found the giveaways like bookmarks, information sheets about books are mostly thrown away or ignored.  Since most of us are not wealthy, we must decide with care to spend our promotion funds.  

Q.  What is one thing you’d like to jump on the rooftop and scream about?

A.  Joy in the adventure of becoming a writer. I’ve been learning for decades and find there is always something new coming my way. I often need to push myself to do that learning, but if it is necessary, I will eventually get to it.  It’s a wonderful way to stay in touch with one’s inner person.  And I love to tell silly tales about my muse.  Evreybody should have one, writer or not.  Those stories provide me a way to laugh at my writing problems.  So give your muse a pat for me and keep it busy. Never know what ideas they will come up with.  

Q.  Okay, too much sugar for you today!  Here’s a nice cup of Chamomile tea and come on over and sit under the cabana and watch the waves roll in.  Now…can you tell us what you love about being a published author and how all those things above doesn’t matter because it’s all part of the whole scheme of things and you wouldn’t have it any other way?


A.  I think I’ve said it all above.  Personal satisfaction. There are so many people I meet who have no hobby or interest after retirement.  I think this is what makes them age mentally which is too sad for words.  Writing keeps me interested in the world, its problems, talking and listening to new acquaintances, and what goes on around me. I can turn things I think were fun or silly incidents into a book. And creating new worlds in words is a wonderful way to keep depression at bay. It is to laugh.

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Straight From the Mouth of Darin Gibby, author of Chasing Hindy



In addition to a thriving career as a novelist, author Darin Gibby is also one of the country’s premiere patent attorneys and a partner at the prestigious firm of Kilpatrick Townsend (www.kilpatricktownsend.com). With over twenty years of experience in obtaining patents on hundreds of inventions from the latest drug delivery systems to life-saving cardiac equipment, he has built IP portfolios for numerous Fortune 500 companies. In addition to securing patents, Gibby helps clients enforce and license their patents around the world, and he has monetized patents on a range of products.

Darin’s first book, Why Has America Stopped Inventing?, explored the critical issue of America’s broken patent system.  His second book, The Vintage Club, tells the story of a group of the world’s wealthiest men who are chasing a legend about a wine that can make you live forever. His third book, Gil, is about a high school coach who discovers that he can pitch with deadly speed and is given an offer to play with the Rockies during a player’s strike. Gil soon discovers, however, that his unexpected gift is the result of a rare disease, and continuing to pitch may hasten his own death.
With a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering and a Master of Business Administration degree, he is highly regarded in Denver’s legal and business community as a patent strategist, business manager, and community leader. He is also a sought-after speaker on IP issues at businesses, colleges and technology forums, where he demonstrates the value of patents using simple lessons from working on products such as Crocs shoes, Izzo golf straps and Trek bicycles.
An avid traveler and accomplished triathlete, Darin also enjoys back country fly-fishing trips and skiing in the Rocky Mountains. He lives in Denver with his wife, Robin, and their four children.
His latest book is the thriller, Chasing Hindy.

WEBSITE & SOCIAL LINKS:

WEBSITE | TWITTER | FACEBOOK


About the Book:

ADDY’S DREAM AS a patent attorney is to help bring a ground breaking energy technology to the world. Addy’s hopes soar when she is wooed by Quinn, an entrepreneur, to join his company that has purportedly invented a car that can run on water using an innovative catalyst. After resigning her partnership to join Quinn, Addy discovers things aren’t as they seem. The patent office suppresses the company’s patent applications and her life is threatened by unknown assailants if she doesn’t resign.

When she is arrested for stealing US technology from the patent office she realizes Quinn has used her. Now, Addy must find a way to clear her name while salvaging her dream of propelling this technology to the world, all while powerful forces attempt to stop her.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble


Thanks for letting us interrogate you!  Can you give us a go-for-the-gut answer as to why you wanted to be an author?

I originally wanted to be able to write stories like John Grisham. I read The Firm when I was a first year law student and thought it was perhaps the most engaging book I’d ever read.

Tell us (we won’t tell promise!) is it all it’s cracked up to be?  I mean what are the perks and what are the demands?
Oh yes, it is worth it. When I released my first book, I did a two day PR event in New York City. A limo ran me around to about 8 studios for interviews.  It was a blast. The downside, of course, is that selling books is really hard. I wish you could just write a book and everyone would instantly discover it.  That never happens.

Which route did you take – traditional or self-published – and can you give us the nitty gritty low down on what’s that like?

I went with a small press—Koehler Books. Koehler published my last two books, The Vintage Club and Gil, and we’ve had a great working relationship.  As such, I decided to use them for Chasing Hindy as well. The good thing about a small publisher is that they usually work with you and usually let you call the shots.  The downside is that they don’t have the marketing power of a large publisher.

What’s the snarkiest thing you can say about the publishing industry?

Trying to get your book noticed. There are so many titles out there, that it takes a ton of work to get a reader’s attention.

Tell us for real what your family feels about you spending so much time getting your book written, polished, edited, formatted, published, what have you?

That’s a sensitive topic, especially when the family is watching a movie on Friday night and I’m trying to bang out a chapter on my laptop and want the lights on. I think that pretty much tells the story.

What was the craziest or insane thing that happened to you in the book publishing process?

When I did a show in NYC and the television host was late. He showed up literally a minute before the show aired, looked over at me, and said,”So what are we going to talk about?” The producer handed him a copy of my book, he looked at the title and then started the interview.

How about the social networks?  Which ones do you believe help and which ones do you wish you could avoid?

I use all of them, but for different purposes.  I may make an initial announcement of my book release and important milestones, but I don’t abuse my friends.  I see authors who are constantly trying to peddle their books and it gets annoying.  I also use ones like Google + so that any important information is easily searchable.

Book sales.  Don’t you just love them (or lack of?)?  How are you making the sales happen for you?

Most sales come through word of mouth so I use every avenue I can think of to get my books into the hands of as many people as I can so that they can pass on the word.  One effective way is through the use of promotions.  These take a lot of work to set up and an understanding publisher, but they do work. I also publish various articles in order to get more publicity.

What is one thing you’d like to jump on the rooftop and scream about?

“Why can’t people learn to get along!”

Okay, too much sugar for you today!  Here’s a nice cup of Chamomile tea and come on over and sit under the cabana and watch the waves roll in.  Now…can you tell us what you love about being a published author and how all those things above doesn’t matter because it’s all part of the whole scheme of things and you wouldn’t have it any other way?

As Stephen King is fond of saying, as long as you can wake up and write, life is going to be okay.  I love thinking of new ideas and finding creative ways to weave those into a story. That alone makes being an author worth it!

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Book Feature: The Trials of Allura by Dina El Shammaa








Allura’s life is a testament to the strength and resilience of educated Middle-Eastern women in the modern age, who are railing against a life that makes little sense, with all its twists and turns. A tower of courage and energy, her enthusiasm to challenge life’s obstacles and temptations reflects some of the mind-blowing hardships various women face. Bound by passion, linked by need, Allura offers readers a better understanding of life in a cross-cultural environment, where women are wrongly perceived by the outside world as spoilt, reclusive, and vulnerable. Social constraints, family upheavals, and unexpected tragedies force Allura to stand on her two feet at a young age and make life-changing decisions, which is when her whole world begins to unravel. Join Allura on her extraordinary journey of highs and lows, humorous encounters, and fateful experiences, which transform her from a shy and sheltered teenager to a courageous, resolute, fiery, and tempestuous woman.




An author inspired by innocence, simplicity and beauty, Dina El Shammaa’s extensive writing background helps her uncover unexpected daily occurrences that affect the lives of millions of women in the region and beyond.

Friday, June 9, 2017

Interview with Raymond Floodgate, author of Life 2 the Full








Life 2 the Full is a self-help book that shows the reader how to improve health and well-being by preventing Illness from happening in the first place. This book will guide you through the elements needed to help you live your life to the full. Life 2 the Full covers such subjects as health and well-being, food, exercise for the body, and exercise for the mind. Stress is also covered in this book, including ways to eliminate it. Other topics include breathing, relaxation, meditation, money, and abundance. The goal is to help the reader achieve a life that is lived to the full. If you are struggling with your life through constant recurring illness, stress, food-related problems, or lack of purpose, Life 2 the Full will teach you how to change the life you are living now into a life that you never thought possible. The book is written in plain English, is easy to understand, and will give you an insight into how easy it is to change your life should you want to.

THE INTERVIEW

Can you tell us what your latest book is all about?

Life 2 the Full explains the reader how they can live their life to the full. I wrote this book in order to present to the reader the 5 element suggested in the book which, when practiced, will help them to live a life without illness and stress and with a mind that is focused and a body that is fit and healthy.

How did you come up with the idea?

After many years of training and studying the subject matter, I realised it was time to put this information into a book and give anyone who was interested the chance to change their life.

What kind of research did you do before and during the writing of this book?

Everything in the book has come from the lifestyle I have been living over the past forty five years I have a daily training regime that includes Tai Chi, Qigong and Meditation; any other information has come from many hours of contemplation or from my own experiences.

Can you give us a short excerpt?

Can you imagine a world, especially your world, being a place where the common cold does not exist, where all major diseases and illnesses no longer occur in the body or in the mind? In your world right now, you may be 40 or 50 or 60 or 70 years old, but still only feel 25 years old. You may notice that friends, relatives and acquaintances who are about the same age as you, are starting to take shorter steps when they walk and their back may be starting to hunch slightly but your strides are long and your back is straight, your muscles are strong and your joints are flexible. Your mind is particularly sharp and alert while those of a similar age to you are starting to dither and be forgetful. When you can be aware of the way you are in your world, and notice how others are in their world, it may concern you a little to see the people you know and love beginning to deteriorate before your eyes, you will then realise that you are now living your life to the full.

In your own experience is it hard to get a nonfiction book published today? How did you do it?

I wanted to get my book out there, so I went down the route of self publication but that also its problems. Promoting, marketing and publicising the book is extremely expensive and doesn't necessarily mean the book will become successful.





Raymond Floodgate is a certified Reiki master and teacher, a qualified practitioner of energy healing, and an energy healing teacher. He was a practitioner and instructor of Shotokan karate for twelve years but now focuses on preventing illness. To this end, he has studied Tai Chi, Qigong, and meditation.