Friday, April 17, 2015

Straight from the Mouth of 'A Mark on Eve' Joel Fox

A native of Massachusetts, Joel Fox is the author of A Mark on Evea modern day paranormal suspense with a historical background. A spell cast by an 18th century witch has condemned Eve Hale to an endless life. Centuries later, her secret could unravel and doom the election of the first female president when Eve dives in front of an assassin's bullet to save the candidate's life. 

He is also the author of the Zane Rigby mystery series. He's spent over 35 years in California politics, serving on numerous state commissions appointed by governors and assembly speakers from both major political parties, working on many ballot issue campaigns, and advising candidates. He is an adjunct professor at the School of Public Policy, Pepperdine University, and has authored hundreds of opinion pieces for many national and state publications including the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, USA Today and Los Angeles Times.

Find out more about his book, The Mark on Eve, on Amazon.  

Questionnaire:

Thanks for letting us interrogate you!  Can you give us a go-for-the-gut answer as to why you wanted to be an author?

I liked the idea of storytelling. I like a tale that grabs hold of you and takes you for an unexpected and satisfying ride. I wanted to see if I could do that.

Tell us (we won’t tell promise!) is it all it’s cracked up to be?  I mean what are the perks and what are the demands?

Time and concentration are the demands. You must focus on so many aspects of writing, the plot, the characters and their evolution, sentence structure—the way the words come off the page to a reader. As Thomas Mann once wrote, “A writer is somebody for whom writing is more difficult than it is for other people.” The perks come with the self-satisfaction that you got it right. (And, maybe a financial reward if you are successful and a bit lucky.)

Which route did you take – traditional or self-published – and can you give us the nitty gritty low down on what’s that like?

I’ve tried both. My current book is self-published. Since I got minimal support from my publisher and had to do much of the selling myself, I figured I should get a larger share of the profits. However, that means I have the sole responsibility for the cover, editing and other functions that the traditional publisher takes care to do.

Tell us for real what your family feels about you spending so much time getting your book written, polished, edited, formatted, published, what have you?

I don’t have any problem in these areas. First of all, I do most of my writing when my wife is sleeping. I tend to write as soon as I get up when I’m fresh, from 5 to 7 a.m. And, my wife is my biggest fan. She pushes and encourages me to do these things: Have you edited yet? Have you polished so we can get the manuscript out?

This is for pet lovers.  If you don’t own a pet, skip this question, but do your pets actually get their food on time or do they have to wait until you type just one more word?

My dogs eat on time. Dogs have an internal clock and they know when its time to eat so they keep nudging you. Best to feed them and put that past you so you can get back to work. If you don’t respond the nudge they don’t give up. And, when you have a 120-pound dog he can nudge pretty well.

In writing your book, how did you deal with the phone ringing, your family needing dinner or your boss calling you saying you’re late?

Again, most of my writing is done in the early morning hours before any of that happens. I like to sleep on my ideas and attack them in the morning. I’m not so good at the end of the day. However, toward the end of a project I could be writing around dinner time. If I’m called to dinner, I’ll say, “I’ll be there in a minute.” Sometimes a minute is actually 15 minutes long.

What was the craziest or insane thing that happened to you in the book publishing process?

I once had an editor at a publishing house write that she was excited about my work and wanted to publish it. She said she needed the OK from the top brass at the publishing house. Soon she sent a note that they turned it down. She drew teardrops on the letter to show her regret. Some time later the publishing house was sold but that editor remained. I asked my agent to send the book back to the editor to show it to her new bosses. She returned it almost immediately saying they don’t publish books like mine. The same editor who gushed over it a couple of years earlier turned it down flat as if were a completely new and unwanted submission. Makes you want to scream.


How about the social networks?  Which ones do you believe help and which ones do you wish you could avoid?

I’m not a web-extrovert so I really wish I could avoid them all. However, all the experts say you must engage and interact on social networks so I try to do so. I think you can be a little more personal connection on Facebook.

Book sales.  Don’t you just love them (or lack of?)?  How are you making the sales happen for you?

I find I do pretty well at book fairs. Talking to readers and explaining the book has led to good sales at these types of events.

What is one thing you’d like to jump on the rooftop and scream about?

I use history in my novels. I think history is important to learn how we got to where we are. I also think it is full of compelling stories and drama that people should be attracted to. So why is it ignored? I once heard a high school history teacher say that he taught the second most despised class in school after calculus. I don’t get it. That’s not the way it should be.

Okay, too much sugar for you today!  Here’s a nice cup of Chamomile tea and come on over and sit under the cabana and watch the waves roll in.  Now…can you tell us what you love about being a published author and how all those things above doesn’t matter because it’s all part of the whole scheme of things and you wouldn’t have it any other way?

Writers need to write, so we keep at it. On the occasion that someone tells you how much he or she enjoyed the story you created out of your imagination it all seems worth it.


Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Straight from the Mouth of 'The Intriguing Life of Ximena Godoy' Graciela Limón

Graciela Limón, born in Los Angeles, California, is the daughter of Mexican immigrants.  She attended public and Catholic schools in her hometown, and continued on to university after which she became a professor of Latina/o Literature.  Parallel to her teaching, she has been an activist in Latina affairs, gender studies and Trans Border issues.  Limón has published nine novels, including her latest work, The Intriguing Life of Ximena Godoy.


Questionnaire:

Thanks for letting us interrogate you!  Can you give us a go-for-the-gut answer as to why you wanted to be an author?

It’s tough to describe the deep desire that I’ve always had to write stories but that’s what it is.  Writing takes me to a world inhabited by people that maybe are a combination of friends and probably even enemies, or they may be purely imagined.  Writing puts me in another world, one I don’t want to leave to return to my ordinary one. 

Tell us (we won’t tell promise!) is it all it’s cracked up to be?  I mean what are the perks and what are the demands?

Yes, it’s all it’s cracked up to be (for me, that is).  For the reasons I’ve just told, there’s great happiness in creating other worlds, although writing isn’t free of pain.  Writing is a lonely, solitary pathway, but one that for me is seductive.  However, its demands diminish in light of the satisfaction writing brings me.  The main perk is to see what was not there come into existence, and I, as the writer, am instrumental in that act of creation. 

Which route did you take – traditional or self-published – and can you give us the nitty gritty low down on what’s that like?

I chose the traditional path (searching until I found a publisher).  It was a bumpy road, one filled with the down-deep hurt of rejection after rejection.  Yet, I hung in there, always hoping that there would be at least one publisher that would recognize the worthiness of my work.  And when I was just about to give it all up in desperation, the miracle happened!  The University of Houston Press (Arte Público Press) read my first manuscript and agreed to publish it.  The rest is history, as the old saying goes. 

Tell us for real what your family feels about you spending so much time getting your book written, polished, edited, formatted, published, what have you?

Everyone around me: family, friends, the mail person, everyone, thinks I’m out of my mind when I embark on a new writing project.  In the beginning it was a mystery to them, but no longer.  Now they just scratch their head knowing there’s nothing to do except wait until the novel is completed, and we break out the champagne.

Do your pets actually get their food on time or do they have to wait until you type just one more word?

I have a pet.  Her name is Lolita (a cocker spaniel).  She’s the only being on the planet that understands my funny behavior while I write a novel.  She never complains, but then, she knows that even if only a little late, she will always be fed and loved.  Without Lolita’s understanding this author would die! 

Are they actually still alive?

Although I love green, living things, I don’t consider myself an authentic plant person -- real gardener.  Do you know what I mean?  All I do is make sure that the sprinklers work so that my grass doesn’t die. 

In writing your book, how did you deal with the phone ringing, your family needing dinner or your boss calling you saying you’re late?

I ignored everything:  bells, whistles, complaining, whining – everything.  I lived only in the world of my novel until I finished it.  Only then did I emerge as if out of a cave. 

What was the craziest or insane thing that happened to you in the book publishing process?

Really, I can’t remember of think of anything that would fit this question.  Perhaps the fact that I’m a writer in the first place is already too insane in itself to find a comparison. 

How about the social networks?  Which ones do you believe help and which ones do you wish you could avoid?

Aside from my website, I don’t participate in the social networks.  I don’t have the time to waste on gossip or useless prattle, and I certainly am not in the mood to let the masses in on my private life.  In our digital age this is pretty dumb, isn’t it?  But there it is.  That’s me, Graciela Limón! 

Book sales.  Don’t you just love them (or lack of?)?  How are you making the sales happen for you?

Oh, this blessing happens only with the help of a wonderful agent, a forward-looking publisher, and an excellent publicity person.  Of course, I hope my work merits the attention and willingness of someone to spend money on my books.  For that I need readers.  They’re the ones that make it happen. 

What is one thing you’d like to jump on the rooftop and scream about?

Happiness for me is the one reader that takes the time to email me to let me know that s/he has read my work and likes it.  That makes me scream with joy, and jump up and down, even on the rooftop. 

Okay, too much sugar for you today!  Here’s a nice cup of Chamomile tea and come on over and sit under the cabana and watch the waves roll in.  Now…can you tell us what you love about being a published author and how all those things above don’t matter because it’s all part of the whole scheme of things and you wouldn’t have it any other way?

I wouldn’t have it any other way because writing is in my DNA.  Being a published author, of course, is the icing on the cake, but the world of books has always and will always take me to heaven.  And to think that I’ve been able to contribute just a little grain of sand to that immense ocean makes me indescribably happy!  So, let’s enjoy those beautiful waves, and thanks so much for the nice cup of Chamomile tea.





Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Straight from the Mouth of Gaylon Kent, author of The Diary of a Nobody

The Diary of a Nobody Book Banner

Thanks for letting us interrogate interview you!  Can you give us a go-for-the-gut answer as to why you wanted to be an author?

I write because Mother Nature planted the seed in me. I never made a conscious decision to be a writer. It was made for me.

I have followed my heart and trusted my instincts my entire life. Almost – almost! – interesting is as a kid I wanted to be a radio announcer. I was an avid reader, of course, and I did well with writing projects in school, but I never dreamt of being a writer growing up.

I was a radio announcer for a few years, but I wasn’t all that good at it and after getting laid off from a job with a baseball team I lost interest.

I then found work as a newspaper reporter and that was when the writing bug bit.

Tell us (we won’t tell promise!) is it all it’s cracked up to be?  I mean what are the perks and what are the demands?

Oh, go ahead and tell.

The God-honest truth is writing is supremely satisfying.

For a writer. If you’re not a writer and you try to write, you may not like it, just like if I tried to make a living at auto repair or pole vaulting  I would starve because I have some zero interest in either auto repair or pole vaulting.

Fortunately, my mechanic has a high level of interest in auto repair.

The perk, life’s ultimate perk, really, is spending your life doing what you were meant to do. There is no greater satisfaction.

And it really doesn’t matter what that is. For me it happens to be writing. For others it might be building a chair or being a doctor or painting. We are all different and we all have something we can do well.

The demands, though, are there are times your wife might want to go out and you have something on your mind that needs to be said. My wife, however, understands this. She may not like it, but she understands it.

You also have zero spare time, because all your time is either spent writing or thinking about writing.

Not that I am complaining. It is nice to have a worthwhile purpose for your life.

Which route did you take – traditional or self-published – and can you give us the nitty gritty low down on what’s that like?

I publish my own work. Many years ago I tried to get an agent, but I could never interest one and ultimate I decided to stop banging my head against the wall.

Looking back, I probably couldn’t find an agent because my early books stunk. Now that I am America’s Foremost Humorist, though, I find I enjoy doing it myself. I like the control over the process I have and I like writing for myself, writing from the heart, then finding an audience for what I’ve done.

The publishing and promotional part of it, however, has been a lot of trial and error. You must remain patient and never quit, because there will be lots of opportunities to do just that.

Tell us for real what your family feels about you spending so much time getting your book written, polished, edited, formatted, published, what have you?

They’re probably glad it keeps me out of bars.
Seriously, they like that I have a purpose for my life. It keeps me happy because if Daddy ain’t happy, well, then Daddy ain’t happy. Big deal. It’s not as if Momma ain’t happy.

Do your pets actually get their food on time or do they have to wait until you type just one more word?

Our cat Bonfiglio gets fed before almost anything.

Here’s the morning drill: I wake up, very early, around 4am. I am older now and usually I have to go to the bathroom at this time. After the morning constitutional I will put the coffee on. This is inviolable. I must have coffee. Even when I’m well rested I need coffee.

Then the cat is fed. She has dry food 24/7, but I will give her a can of yummies. Her anticipation of yummies is as great as her expectance of them.

Then I write. The cat has lobbied for yummies, then Daddy’s constitutional, but Daddy isn’t going for that.

In writing your book, how did you deal with the phone ringing, your family needing dinner or your boss calling you saying you’re late?

No one calls me! I am like my dad: not the type of person people like to bother for something as trivial as saying hi. My phone seldom rings and if you do call me, it is for a good reason.

Besides, I do most of my writing very early in the morning, before the wife is up and before polite folk are working the phones. Presuming people called me. Which they don’t.

How about the social networks?  Which ones do you believe help and which ones do you wish you could avoid?

I like Facebook, a lot, but have never really taken to Twitter, so to speak. I find the 140 character limit annoying.

What is one thing you’d like to jump on the rooftop and scream about?
       
“WE HAVE ONE CHANGE AT THIS LIFE, FRIENDS. THE PEOPLE WHO ARE HAPPIEST, LIKE ME, ARE THOSE THAT SPEND THEIR LIVES FOLLOWING THEIR HEARTS AND TRUSTING THEIR INSTINCTS, BECAUSE THEY WILL INVARIABLY TAKE YOU WHERE YOU WANT TO GO!”



Okay, too much sugar for you today!  Here’s a nice cup of Chamomile tea and come on over and sit under the cabana and watch the waves roll in.  Now…can you tell us what you love about being a published author and how all those things above doesn’t matter because it’s all part of the whole scheme of things and you wouldn’t have it any other way?

Thank you. I like watching the waves.

The best part about being a writer is writing, sitting down every day and doing my work.

Of course, it is nice selling books and it is really nice when someone says they like your work. But books don’t write themselves and every good thing stems from sitting down and actually writing.

It’s a long life and it took many years to realize this. When I was a young writer I would have said “phooey” if someone tried to tell me this, I want to sell books and be famous.

Now, while I would present no violent objection to selling 40 million books and being famous, I would rather sit down and put the work in required to make that happen.

Thank you for the tea.  




The Diary of a Nobody From earning a living to getting the dog to poop to running for the United States Senate, The Diary of a Nobody chronicles the life of Sparrow, a funny, average man passing an average life. In addition to Sparrow, you’ll meet The Wife, the cat, the dog, his friend Bonser and his rug rat Matt and Brian, Sparrow’s co-worker at the Doily Delivery Company.

 The Diary of a Nobody is a real-time novel, updated daily at www.writersshack.com. It begins in October, 2013 and was inspired by a 19th century British novel of the same name. Gaylon Kent, 49, is an American writer. In addition to The Diary of a Nobody, Gaylon has written the novel The Regular Guys and Backstairs at the Monte Carlo: A Vegas Memoir. He also writes the columns The Daily Dose and The Bottom Ten. All of Gaylon’s work is available exclusively at www.writersshack.com.

 In past lives Gaylon has been, among other things, a radio announcer and a newspaper reporter, as well as working security at the Monte Carlo and Venetian/Palazzo hotels in Las Vegas and working a Brinks armored truck. Gaylon was the Colorado Libertarian Party’s nominee for United States Senate in 2014, finishing third in a six-person race with a bit more than 52,000 votes. He is a two-time graduate of the Harry Wendelstedt School for Umpires and is an accomplished high school sports official. Gaylon served on an old diesel submarine, the USS Blueback, in the Navy and still like his grandfather, Gaylon C Kent, commands his American Legion post. Gaylon and his wife Marian live in Hayden, Colorado. He is originally from Los Angeles. He enjoys a wine pairing from time to time and is known to not wash his coffee mug.

  For More Information

Straight From The Mouth Of: The Redeeming Power Of Brain Surgery Author Paul Flower

Thanks for letting us interrogate you! Can you give us a go-for-the-gut answer as to why you wanted to be an author?

Looking back, I realize my mother instilled in my brothers and I a love of reading and books. Oh, and here’s a kind of creepy fact: I used to watch the television show “The Waltons” (it’s a 70s thing) and imagine being John Boy, the narrator/oldest son/author. Sounds very quaint and a little dumb now, but that character made storytelling real to me. Then when I read The Grapes of Wrath in high school, I was awed not just by the story, but also by the way it was written. Steinbeck’s use of language and descriptive powers inspired me and they still do. He and others showed me the art of saying something, of describing something, in a way that was new, fresh and revealing. He moved me. I wanted to do that; I still want to do that. It was the words and how he arranged them. It’s always been about that for me.

Tell us (we won’t tell promise!) is it all it’s cracked up to be? I mean what are the perks and what are the demands?

After more than three decades of writing professionally (primarily in advertising), it is still very demanding work; emphasis on the word “work.” Writing long form fiction can be incredibly taxing. A reader turns the page and sees what’s next. An author turns the page and sees a blank page. Book-length fiction requires patience, stamina and an ego big enough to think you can create something people will buy. One of the perks is that I get to breathe life into people and their stories; it’s a God-like thing. The downside is that patience. You have to toil at it, constantly revising and polishing, many times with no certainty that the story’s threads are all going to weave together. Then there’s the leap of faith you are taking that someone else will ever read it. Ultimately, the real satisfaction––the ultimate perk––is stepping back and reading it and being moved by your own work. My reaction typically is, “where did that come from?”

Which route did you take – traditional or self-published – and can you give us the nitty gritty low down on what’s that like?

I wrote the first draft of The Redeeming Power of Brain Surgery nearly 30 years before it was published by Scribe Publishing of Royal Oak, MI. That first draft came in the age of the big publishing houses––they controlled the industry. Over the years, I accumulated a huge file of rejections. I kept revising the manuscript, and while I got some positive feedback about the story, no one would take it on. Even as self-publishing became a viable option, I always felt the book (and I) needed the affirmation and support that came from having a publisher. The turning point came in 2009. I had lost my full-time job in advertising. One day, I was searching for freelance writing gigs on craigslist, and found a post from Scribe, a publishing startup begun by Jennifer Baum at Scribe. I pitched the book. She bought it. The irony is, companies like Scribe are products of the digital age––you no longer need a huge staff and printing operations to publish books––and I lost my job in the ad world in part because of changes brought on by the digital age. Go figure.

What’s the snarkiest thing you can say about the publishing industry (e.g. rejections, the long wait, etc.)

Back when I finished that first draft, the big publishing houses wouldn’t publish manuscripts that weren’t represented by agents and agents wouldn’t represent authors who’d never been published. While I recognize there is a lot of mediocre material out there, and there needs to be a way to weed it out, I can’t help but think there are also good authors who simply gave up because of that system. As media evolve and the idea of “book” evolves with it, I hope there’s room for good, fresh voices.

Tell us for real what your family feels about you spending so much time getting your book written, polished, edited, formatted, published, what have you?

My wife and kids (we have four, now all grown) were always supportive, mostly because I have been an advertising copywriter for 33 years. Writing was always my thing. As far as how they felt about the fiction writing and my near-endless quest to be published, well there was a lot of good-natured kidding about “dad writes books, too bad nobody has seen them.” (This is what I get for raising smart alecks.) I do have to add that my wife always has encouraged me––literally couldn’t have gotten to this point without her––and my family was as thrilled as I was when this book was published.

What was the craziest or insane thing that happened to you in the book publishing process?

Oh that’s easy. I spent 30 years toiling in advertising and writing fiction on the side, hoping to become an author. Then I lost my advertising job, in part because of the digital boom. I became published, in part because of the digital boom. It’s the stuff of fiction.

How about the social networks? Which ones do you believe help and which ones do you wish you could avoid?

I stick to Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads and LinkedIn. They make it easy to tell readers and potential readers what I’m up to, and also are good ways to get feedback. I have to admit, I’m barely scratching the surface on how to use them effectively.

Book sales. Don’t you just love them (or lack of?)? How are you making the sales happen for you?

I have spent a lot of time emailing book stores, book festivals, newspapers, radio stations––anyone who might let me do a book signing or who might want to interview me. I am constantly networking via social media, too. I have a press release about the book. Through all of that, I’ve been invited to several signings and interviews. You name it, I’ve been doing it. Promoting your book is almost as challenging as getting published. You can’t give up.

What is one thing you’d like to jump on the rooftop and scream about?

I think there are many many goodhearted people out there who have dreams of publishing a novel. Quite often, many people trivialize the process and make it sound easy. It’s not for anybody. It’s heavy lifting. You sweat and bleed over it. It is art. I think self-publishing is a great thing. It’s opened the door to many talented people and their books. But I also am frustrated that it’s made “getting published” a little less special.

Can you tell us what you love about being a published author and how all those things above doesn’t matter because it’s all part of the whole scheme of things and you wouldn’t have it any other way?

Bam. That’s it. You said it. The thing I love the most is when I can talk not about being published, but about what I published. I love to read a passage, to hear the cadence and feel what I’m hoping every reader will feel. I love the idea that someone might close her or his eyes and see the scene I have in my head and feel the pain that character felt at that moment. In the end, it’s not about being an author. It’s about the words. It’s about knowing that all the rejection and revisions and polishing and selling ends with someone, somewhere reading a sentence I wrote and being moved by it.


About The Book


The Redeeeming Power of Brain Surgery


TitleThe Redeeming Power of Brain Surgery: A Suspense Novel 
Author: Paul Flower
Publisher: Scribe Publishing Company
Publication Date: June 1, 2013
Pages: 250
ISBN: 978-0985956271
Genre: Susepense
Format: Paperback, eBook (.mobi / Kindle), PDF


Book Description:

Jesse Tieter, M.D. has carefully constructed the ideal life. But lately, neither his Chicago-based neurology practice nor his wife and son are enough to suppress the memories that have haunted him since he was a little boy. He can't stop thinking about that summer day in 1967 when his father died.

So Jesse is heading back. Back to the town and the place where a long-repressed horror occurred. Back to make sure his twin keeps the family's secret buried.

But what will he uncover along the way?


Book Excerpt:


His son’s hand felt like a lie. Lately, to him, everything felt this way. The look of sadness on his wife’s face, the burn of a drink in his throat, the whine of a saw in the O.R.; nothing seemed true. Nothing was real anymore. He felt out of balance, too. Even now, the school building, the flag slapping against the heavy fall sky¬¬—everything was tipping away from him. It was as though he’d gotten up that morning and screwed on his head carelessly, as though he hadn’t threaded it good and tight. While shaving, he’d cut himself, a discrete, semi-intentional knick just under the curve of his chin. He’d stood there like an idiot, eyes feeding the message “blood” to his brain, nerve endings responding with “pain” and the logic center unable to formulate a response.

“Dad? Daddy?”

“Uh? Wha’?”

“Pick up the pace. Chop chop. Move out.”

Now, as he snaked through the crush of other parents and children, he had to look down to convince himself the boy was there, attached to the hand, flesh and bone. The red hair, “his mother’s hair” everyone called it, was sliced by a crisp white part; his head bounced in beat with his sneakered feet. The child was so painfully real he couldn’t be a lie.

It amazed him that his son looked so much like his wife, especially the tiny mouth, the way it was set in a crooked, determined line. He was a kid who liked to have fun, but he could be fierce. Today, the challenge of a new school year, of third grade, had brought out the determined streak. This was good. They would need that streak, he and his mother would.

“Whoa.”  The tiny hand now was a road sign, white-pink flesh facing him, commanding him. Far enough. He obeyed. Squatting, arms out for the anticipated embrace, he suddenly wanted to tell everything. Tears swam. His throat thickened. The earth tilted and threatened to send him skittering over its edge. There was the slightest of hugs, the brush of lips on his cheek then the boy was off, skipping toward the steps as though third grade challenged nothing, caused no fear, as though the world was in perfect balance.

He walked back to his Lincoln Navigator with the exaggerated care of a drunk who didn’t want anyone to know his condition. He got behind the wheel and suddenly was no longer in his 50s; he felt 16 and too small, too skinny and insignificant to handle the giant SUV.

He nosed the vehicle toward home, alternately trembling and gripping the wheel as he merged with the morning traffic. The plan struck him now as odd and silly, the challenges too great. His hands, already red and scaly, itched fiercely. Get a grip, he told himself. Get a grip.

His tired mind—when was the last time he’d really slept well?—jumped from one stone of thought to another. Was everything covered at work? The bills—had he paid them all? Did his wife suspect anything? Yes. No. Absolutely. Of course not. Relax. Relax. He left the expressway at the exit that took him past their church and wondered if the church, too, was a lie. What of the wedding there so many years ago?

Through a stoplight and past a Dunkin’ Donuts, his gaze floated around a corner. A flash of inspiration—hit the gas. Let the tires slide and the back-end arc around. Let physics have its way until the big vehicle broke free from the grip of gravity and danced head over end, coming to a stop with him bleeding and mercifully, gratefully dead inside.

No. He had something to do. Had he figured the angles right? Gotten the plan tight enough?

A horn jabbed through his reverie. He had drifted into the turn lane of the five-lane street. He jerked the wheel and cut across traffic into the right lane. Tires screeched, horns screamed. A black Toyota streaked past on his left, the driver’s fist, middle finger erect, thrust out the window.

Rage, sharp and bitter, bubbled in his throat. He hesitated, then jammed his foot on the accelerator, cut the wheel hard, and sent the Navigator careening into the left lane.

A staccato barrage of profanity pounded the inside of his skull. He bit his tongue to keep the words in. His heart hammered and a familiar, dizzying pressure filled his ears. The SUV roared ahead, past one car, past a semi then another car, quickly closing the gap on the speeding Toyota. He couldn’t see the car’s driver but he could imagine him, some stupid, simple-minded schmuck, eyes locked on the rear-view mirror as the lumbering Lincoln grew larger, larger, larger. The instant before he would slam into the smaller vehicle, he jabbed his brake and turned again to the left. There was a squeal of tires and more horns bleating behind him; the semi rig’s air horn bellowed angrily past. Ramrod straight, eyes fixed ahead on the now-slow-moving car disappearing tentatively around a curve, he brought the Navigator to a shuddering stop in the center lane. He tensed and waited for the resounding WHUMP of a crash from behind. None came. Face flushed and eyes gleaming, suddenly rejuvenated, he accelerated quickly then eased the Navigator back into the flow of traffic—no looking back.



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About The Author

Paul Flower
   

Paul Flower is an author, advertising copywriter/creative director and a journalist.

He has written and produced award-winning advertising for print, radio, television, outdoor, the Web––really, just about every medium––for business-to-consumer and business-to-business accounts.

His news features have appeared in regional and national magazines. His first novel, “The Redeeming Power of Brain Surgery,” was published in June 2013 by Scribe Publishing. Visit Paul’s website at paulflower.net.  

Connect with Paul:

Author Website: paulflower.net 
Author Page / Publisher Website: http://scribe-publishing.com/brain/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/paulflower.writer 
Twitter: https://twitter.com/flowerpaul Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7137509.Paul_Flower  

 
The Redeeming Power of Brain Surgery

Monday, April 13, 2015

Guest post from H.O. Tanager, author of Autograph Penis

Autograph Penis Book Banner

Autograph PenisTitle: Autograph Penis
Author: H.O. Tanager
Publisher: H.O. Tanager
Pages: 282
Genre: Nonfiction
Format: Paperback/Kindle

 Performance artist H. O. Tanager holds high hopes for her cross-country trip to Boston: to see great art, to eat delicious food... and to incite mayhem. But once the journey actually begins, it’s all she can do to hold on for the ride. Surrounded by brilliant, intimidating, and sometimes delicious-smelling colleagues, Tanager’s precarious hold on her ambition and desire threatens to unravel in the face of laryngitis, an angry God, and the unexpected death of a friend. Will her team’s independent spirit and wit buoy Tanager though the pitfalls, heartache - and yes, mayhem - as hundreds of artists strive to be the best that ever was, the best that’s ever been?

 For More Information:
  Autograph Penis is available at Amazon.
Pick up your copy at Barnes & Noble. 
Discuss this book at PUYB Virtual Book Club at Goodreads.    



Hello dear #readers! The time we have #anticipated for #months is upon @us - it is #BookBlogTour time for Autograph Penis, the #sweetest story ever #told about performance #poetry! For two-plus months #kind #bloggers will be featuring the words of @moi upon their virtual #pages. #soblessed #soreal #pumpupyourbook

Now as you have #intuited by now, those who #know @moi, I participate in performances and #promotions for one reason: to gain #compliments. #vanity #selfesteem #fragile #butwhynot #soblessed I recently checked in on #Goodreads and found some new #reviews, ranging from 1 to 5 stars! #controversy

Now that's #range.
Now that’s #range.
One kind #reviewer of the four-star #variety said quite #lovely things:

How #kind! #soblessed
How #kind! #soblessed
Now, in the #cruel #world of performance poetry, if I got one very high and one very low score as I did #here at @Goodreads, we would #say, “@You must have really #affected people!” And indeed, I must #have! I was curious as to what my one-star reviewer might #enjoy in #books, and it is light #romances about dating one’s best friend’s #brother. So good #luck to @her and may she enjoy her #choices. #notmykindofgirl #soblessed

Meanwhile, completely #different people have #reviewed on @Amazon. It is my #understanding that @Amazon owns @Goodreads, but their reviews do not cross-populate. We can only #speculate that it is to create a #false dichotomy between “real #readers” on @Goodreads and “fake not-#readers who merely #consume books” on @Amazon. Because @Goodreads is a “community” and @Amazon is a “marketplace.” I’ve noticed my #reviews are better on @Amazon…

amazonreviews
…possibly because my @Goodreads reviews are largely from people who got the #book for #free as part of my #giveaway in December, while the @Amazon reviews seem to be from people who heard of the #book through the poetry slam #grapevine. Neither #source seems free of #bias! #confusing #ego #salesmanship #fatigue #mystery But we will #continue to #learn what can #happen when one publishes a #book, like the good #learners we hopefully #are. #realauthor #soblessed

Ah, my #dears, I do wonder why we write #books at all, when there are so very #many of #them! But more now than #ever in the history of #personkind, we #can publish books, and so we #shall publish books, and perhaps the #whys will become obvious in #retrospect. #wisdom #somuchwisdom #soblessed

And for the #wisest and #best gift we’ve received this #week, let us gaze upon @DesireeDallagiacomo! For those of you not #addicted to attending #National-level poetry events, @Desiree can not stay #off Finals stages – why, they #reach out and scoop her #onto them even if she’s not #competing! @Desiree must be on all Finals stages! And instead of #crying about the #kidnapping of her personal #time, she rises to the occasion again and #again, bringing #new #works all the time! She is a @soldier of @poetryGodness! #soblessed




H.O. Tanager

H. O. Tanager is an author, adventurer, and provocateur who divides her time amongst her passions: family, satirical performance pieces, and convincingly wearing slacks. She’s achieved so many things, she finds achievements boring. What she does like is surprise, and people who work hard, juxtaposition, and repurposing forms for her own amusement.

For More Information

Visit H.O.’s website. Connect with H.O. on Facebook and Twitter.

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Straight from the Mouth of 'Seasons of Empowerment for Adolescent Girls' Irene S. Roth

Irene S. Roth is an academic and freelance writer for teens, tweens and kids. She has written over 500 book reviews and 1,000 online articles on different topics for teens, tweens, and about the craft of writing. She also teaches workshops on writing and craft at Savvy Authors. She lives in Stratford, Ontario with her husband and cat.

Check out her book, Seasons of Empowerment for Adolescent Girls on Amazon.

Questionnaire:

Thanks for letting us interrogate you!  Can you give us a go-for-the-gut answer as to why you wanted to be an author?

I wanted to be an author because I really was inspired to instruct people on how to live their best possible life. I guess I was a born teacher.

Tell us (we won’t tell promise!) is it all it’s cracked up to be?  I mean what are the perks and what are the demands?

The perks of writing are so immense that they cannot be put into writing for myself. However, the biggest perk is doing something that I not only truly love but through which I can be a lifelong learner.  How GREAT to feel that you lived a life worth living!J

Which route did you take – traditional or self-published – and can you give us the nitty gritty low down on what’s that like?

I self-published this book because frankly I had a few hundred or so girls who were eager to see my book and to hold it in their hands. So, I wanted to publish it quickly. And it was really quick!

Tell us for real what your family feels about you spending so much time getting your book written, polished, edited, formatted, published, what have you?

My family got used to me being a writer. There are still days that they revert.  But I am way too committed to my writing to allow them to put a dent in my motivation or time spent at the desk.

Do your pets actually get their food on time or do they have to wait until you type just one more word?

Yes, my kitten gets fed first thing in the morning.  And I give him love all day too.  He is my writing companion and he is never alone or neglected.

Are they actually still alive?

Yes, all my plants live because I take breaks to water them and to give them the occasional pep talk…J

In writing your book, how did you deal with the phone ringing, your family needing dinner or your boss calling you saying you’re late?

I just don’t answer the phone.  And all my friends know not to call me during my writing time. This has become known as Irene’s sacred time.

What was the craziest or insane thing that happened to you in the book publishing process?

When I was publishing my first book, I didn’t expect it to arrive in the mail so fast. So, I was pleasantly surprised and screamed when it happened.  I even alarmed my cat.

How about the social networks?  Which ones do you believe help and which ones do you wish you could avoid?

I think writers could spend too much time on social media. So, I do a few hours a week and that is all.

Book sales.  Don’t you just love them (or lack of?)?  How are you making the sales happen for you?

I have a publicist to help me along with book sales.  And it really helps tremendously.

What is one thing you’d like to jump on the rooftop and scream about?

That the writer’s life is the best life and everyone should try it!

Okay, too much sugar for you today!  Here’s a nice cup of Chamomile tea and come on over and sit under the cabana and watch the waves roll in.  Now…can you tell us what you love about being a published author and how all those things above doesn’t matter because it’s all part of the whole scheme of things and you wouldn’t have it any other way?

I love being an author because I love writing. I couldn’t not write. It is who I am.  I can’t not be a writer and be the person that I am. So, nothing gets in my way, and if I have to live in a hut all alone in a desert I will do it to write.


Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Two Princes: The Biker and The Billionaire by Victoria Danann (Book Cover Reveal Event)



 About The Book 




Title:  Two Princes: The Biker and The Billionaire
Author: Victoria Danann
Genre: Contemporary Romance
Publisher:  dba7th House Publishing, Imprint of Andromeda LLC
Publication Date: June 16, 2015


Preorder Book Buy Links:
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
Apple iTunes
Kobo


Brigid Roan is a graduate student at the University of Texas. She had no trouble getting her thesis approved, but finding a Hill Country motorcycle club willing to give her access to their lifestyle had started to seem impossible. Then she got a lead. A friend of a friend had a cousin with ties to The Sons of Sanctuary.

What she wanted was information to prove a proposition. What she didn’t want was to fall for one of the members of the club. Especially since she had set out to prove that motorcycle clubs are organized according to the same structure as primitive tribal society.

Brash Fornight was standing in line at the H.E.B. Market when his world tipped on its axis. While waiting his turn to check out, his gaze had wandered to the magazine display and settled on the new issue of “NOW”. The image on the cover, although GQ’d up in an insanely urbane way, was… him.

After reading the article, Brash threw some stuff in a duffle and left his club, The Sons of Sanctuary, with a vague explanation about needing a couple of days away. He left his Jeep at the Austin airport and caught a plane for New York, on a mission to find the guy who was walking around with his face.

Two brothers, one a player, one a playboy, are on a collision course with destiny and a woman who thought she won a prize when she was allowed a look inside the Sons of Sanctuary MC.


About The Author


Victoria Danann


Victoria Danann is the USA TODAY Bestselling Author of The Knights of Black Swan, which has won BEST PARANORMAL ROMANCE SERIES TWO YEARS IN A ROW (2013, 2014). Reviewers Choice Awards, The Paranormal Romance Guild.

Victoria writes cross-genre with uniquely fresh perspectives on paranormal creatures, characters, and themes. She is making her debut into contemporary romance with publication of the SUMMER FIRE ultimate romance collection anthology. It contains a novella intro to the Sons of Sanctuary MC series. The first full novel of the series will be released June 16, 2015.

Contact Victoria at: