Tuesday, January 11, 2022

Straight From the Mouth of Author John Neral

 

10 Things You Might Not Know About Author John Neral



1.
 John is a Professional Bowler and won a title on the Professional Bowlers Association Regional  Tour.

2. John had a 25-year career in education before launching his coaching practice full-time. He taught middle school mathematics for 14 years. He then moved into various administrative and professional development roles that included working for a state superintendent and serving as a Training and Staffing Director for an educational non-profit.

3. One of John’s first jobs was as a church organist. At 13, John studied under Father Alphonse Stephenson, a renowned musician and Broadway conductor. It was an unusual job for a teenager, but John became an in-demand musician for various church functions. This also led to John playing piano for several local community theatre productions. He maintained a career in church music for over ten years.

4. John directed an a capella group at Loyola College in Maryland called “The Notables.” Their biggest performance was singing the National Anthem for the Baltimore Orioles. John vividly remembers conducting the group and seeing himself on the JumboTron.


5. 
John is an avid game-show enthusiast. He has fond memories of sitting with his grandmother watching game shows. In 2005, John appeared on GSN’s Chain Reaction and later appeared on a TV Land reality show called “Make My Day.” He hopes to appear on Wheel of Fortune or The Price is Right someday.

6. John always wanted to go skydiving until he accompanied his best friend on a flying lesson. They went up in a 4-seater, and there was a lot of turbulence that day. That ended John’s desire to jump out of a plane.

7. John has a fear of bugs – anything creepy or crawly freaks him out.

8. John’s biggest pet peeve is bad table manners. Close your mouth when you chew! LOL.

9. Growing up, John wanted a career in television as a meteorologist but was told by someone that he didn’t “have the right look for tv.” He let that squash his dreams, and it is one of his biggest regrets that he never pursued that dream. However, life is wonderful, and things do work out for the best.

10. One of John’s “worst” jobs was working for a party rental company, where he helped put up party tents for large events. He hated that job and lasted six days on a dare because his father didn’t believe he would last more than one week. John went into work on day six and quit. He was so bad at that job that his boss let him go immediately. 



John Neral, MA, CPC reawakens, energizes, galvanizes, and innovates the mind think of employees, corporations, associations, and systems. A celebrated executive/career and professional development coach and in-demand, mindset-shifting public speaker, John’s professional walk included a 25-year career in education and a longstanding corporate consultant for Fortune 500 giant, Casio America, Inc. He now leads John Neral Coaching, LLC, one of the most progressive, mindset-shifting professional and organizational coaching and public speaking firms in the U.S. He is the author of Your Mid-Career GPS – Four Steps to Figuring Out What’s Next and SHOW UP – Six Strategies to Lead a More Energetic and Impactful Career and the host of “The Mid-Career GPS Podcast.”

As a Master Practitioner in the Energy Leadership Index, John’s experience has made him an impactful and valuable coach to his one-on-one and group coaching clients and organizations. With Energy Leadership™, John identifies where people perform at their optimal levels and when they are under stress. Combining the Energy Leadership™ principles, a client’s workplace strengths, and their “unique professional value,” John helps his clients create their career GPS so they can take action toward achieving their professional and personal goals.

A former church organ prodigy, John is an avid traveler–having sojourned to 5 of the 7 continents, a professional bowler and the winner of a Professional Bowlers’ Association Regional Title (2010), and a game-show fan, having appeared on previous episodes of GSN’s Chain Reaction and Make My Day. John is happily married and lives with his spouse and their rescue cat, Amy Farrah Meowler (named after the Big Bang Theory character), in the heart of Washington DC’s Dulles Technology Corridor, Tysons Corner, VA.

You can visit his website at https://johnneral.com or follow him at TwitterFacebook and Goodreads.

 

Tuesday, January 4, 2022

Straight From the Mouth of Author Erik Lewin

 

The Inspiration Behind This is How I Spell Grief


By Eric Lewin


I was grieving the loss of my mom, and the closest book I could find that related to how I felt was Stephen King’s The Shining. There was something wrong with this picture! I didn’t identify with any of the standard “five stages of grief” fare promoted by most experts – so I found myself jotting down my own feelings and observations on the subject; there were certainly many facets to consider.

Grief is first and foremost a human experience. The conviction that no books were particularly helpful gave me the freedom to explore the subject more fully for myself. It helped me touch into some tender areas I had been afraid to feel before, which was ultimately very cathartic. I grew excited to


share my findings with others.

We’re all part of a community of mourners, a broken hearts club every human on the planet belongs to. It is a meaningful connection and a common ground. We can help each other face our fears, and writing this book allowed me to be vulnerable, by example.

I’m aware that grief and loss might not be everyone’s favorite topic – not too many people are in a hurry to talk about their lost loved ones – but I figured, somebody’s got to! The idea that I could be of service during such a hard time for a fellow mourner gave me inspiration. Hopefully people accept this offer of service and read the book! It’s an honor to offer it.

Erik Lewin

1


Erik Lewin
 is the author of three books – This is How I Spell GriefAnimal Endurance, and Son of Influence – as well as numerous essays published in Ponder Review, GNU Journal, David Magazine, Real Vegas Magazine &Literate Ape. Erik is also a stand-up comedian who performs in clubs and venues around the country. He formerly practiced law as a criminal defense attorney in New York City and Los Angeles. He is at work on a new one-man show loosely based on This is How I Spell Grief.

Erik lives in Las Vegas with his wife and their furry pets.

Visit his website at www.eriklewincomedy.com or connect with him on Facebook and Goodreads.

Monday, December 13, 2021

Straight From the Mouth of J. Stewart Dixon, Author of 'Spirituality for Badasses'


Spirituality for Badasses and 21 Days blossomed out J. Stewart’s life as a spiritual seeker, finder and teacher. He teaches based on his direct experience, twenty-nine years of interaction with numerous nonduality-advaita-zen-unorthodox teachers, his ongoing education / certification in modern mindfulness and a degree in communications / engineering from Syracuse University.

He has been interviewed by Rick Archer on Buddha at the Gas Pump, was the meditation editor of the mind/body/spirit blog All Things Healing, was a board member of Sevenoaks Retreat Center (a nondenominational spiritual retreat center in Madison, VA) and is the owner/founder of a tech design -install firm called Charlottesville Audio Visual Services.

J. Stewart Dixon has been a very creative individual for most of his life. In addition to two self-published books, he has written and produced a rock musical, has two professionally produced and recorded CDs with his former band Alchemy and has dabbled in abstract art.

He lives in central Virginia with his family. When he’s not working or creating he can be found cavorting with the fish, bears, and bald eagles on the local rivers with a fly rod in his hand.

Visit his website at http://www.spiritualityforbadasses.com or connect with him on Facebook.


INTERVIEW



Thanks for letting us interrogate you!  Can you give us a go-for-the-gut answer as to why you wanted to be an author?

I didn’t know until I was 52. When I published Spirituality for Badasses on Amazon and it went to #1 in 9 categories, went on to win some awards a few months later, and then paid my mortgage one month. At that point I said- hmmmm??? -  I like this.

Tell us (we won’t tell promise!) is it all it’s cracked up to be?  I mean what are the perks and what are the demands?

If you think you can do this work without the work part- don’t even start.  It’s 25% writing, creativity and fun and 75% hard work, marketing , PR and sitting a computer desk all day.

Which route did you take – traditional or self-published – and can you give us the nitty gritty low down on what’s that like?

I’m self-published and wouldn’t have it any other way. More control. More creativity. More profits. Screw the big 5 major publishers – they only publish people who are already famous with reality TV shows and who are related to the Kardashians. Yuck. 

What’s the snarkiest thing you can say about the publishing industry?

I just said it.  Screw the big 5 major publishers – they only publish people who are already famous with reality TV shows and who are related to the Kardashians. Yuck.

Tell us for real what your family feels about you spending so much time getting your book written, polished, edited, formatted, published, what have you?

My wife just said to me yesterday (after going through our financials)  that I’m spending more money than I’m making, which I was well aware of. I think she’s shitting bricks right now.  But we have savings, my book is doing awesome and I have more to offer and more to come. I ain’t worried, but I still have to convince my wife.

What was the craziest or insane thing that happened to you in the book publishing process?

It went to #1 in 9 Amazon categories. It won 2 Global book awards.  I had a fan send me a photo of her reading the book on the beach- that fucking rocked.

How about the social networks?  Which ones do you believe help and which ones do you wish you could avoid?

I got kicked off twitter. So screw you twitter.

I use facebook and I occasionally get shit from my fans because I do.  In the book I advise readers to remove social media from their phones– as a way of creating some space in life. So- they mistake this advise with getting rid of social media entirely.  I have social media, just not on my phone- but on my computer in the basement.  I control it. It doesn’t control me.  Win-win.

Book sales.  Don’t you just love them (or lack of?)?  How are you making the sales happen for you?

Facebook ads have been the only method for consistent sales.  I neurotically check my sales every day.  I sell about 50-75 copies per day.  I worked very hard to achieve this.

What is one thing you’d like to jump on the rooftop and scream about?

I just quit my day job!!!!  Yahoo!!!!!!  (I actually celebrated this at a small party about a week ago and it was awesome.

Okay, too much sugar for you today!  Here’s a nice cup of Chamomile tea and come on over and sit under the cabana and watch the waves roll in.  Now…can you tell us what you love about being a published author and how all those things above doesn’t matter because it’s all part of the whole scheme of things and you wouldn’t have it any other way?

Well, I’m a self-help author.  When I get quotes/reviews like these for Spirituality for Badasses my heart swoons and I jump for joy:

“This book has changed my life and I'm not even halfway through it yet”- Celene

“It isn’t often that one book can make me smile, bring me to tears and make me think… thank you & congrats!-“ Henri

 

 Spirituality for Badasses is available at:


https://www.amazon.com/Secret-Baby-Second-Chance-Stillwater/dp/1335456252/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8 

Monday, November 8, 2021

Straight From the Mouth of David Amerland: How To Achieve Greater Control Over Your Life

 



How To Achieve Greater Control Over Your Life

By David Amerland, Author INTENTIONAL: HOW TO LIVE, LOVE, WORK AND PLAY MEANINGFULLY

 


Here are two unquestionable truths: Our life, no matter how long it ends up being, is relatively short and so is our memory of the world. Each of us only has a tiny window of time and opportunity to achieve happiness, enjoy good health and create wealth.

Given these two truths you’d think we’d be raring to hit the ground running from birth, soak up all the skills and knowledge we can and develop every talent we have in order to make the most of what we can possibly be. None of these things happen however. And even if they do, they happen haphazardly, with greater effort and over massive obstacles.

Why?

Mainly because the world around us is not geared to help us do any of this. If we do try, and if we do succeed it is always a story of triumph over adversity, a tale of success in overcoming great hurdles placed in our way. Intuitively you know this already. It is the reason we love reading and listening to success stories and why we love rug-to-riches tales. They remind us of what is possible rather than the difficulties we perceive around us. They stop us from feeling trapped by opening up cracks in the walls around us through which glimmers of hope shine through.

But how do we go from seeing those glimmers of hope to actually experiencing the kind of change that can transform our life? This is where Intentional can help. Being intentional in life means being in control. This is not the same as having control of everything and everyone or being controlling.


Psychology sees a sense of control as having freedom to choose and a sense of agency. Neuroscience regards control as having “neuroanatomical correlates of the sense of control: [with] Gray and white matter volumes associated with an internal locus of control”. Whether you personally feel that the brain and mind are separate or that the duality of mind and body exists is immaterial here. The fact remains that when it comes to taking responsibility over your choices and control over your direction in life you will need to experiment to find what works best for you.

In order to experiment you need confidence, grit, perception, a sense of direction and the willingness to trust in yourself. You have to believe in your values and be able to formulate your action plan and strive to make your vision come true. All of these things represent modular, personal attributes and skills which create, for lack of a better description, our operating system.

If we had a team of neuroscientists, behavioral psychologists and life coaches training us, none of us would ever fail at anything and when we did it would be a blip in a life that, from the outside in, would appear to be destined for greatness.

Unfortunately, we all know this is not how the ‘real world’ works. Not only we don’t have anyone of merit rooting for us but most of our daily interactions with people appear to be designed to grind us down and keep us in our place. This is not intentional, or at least it is not pre-meditated. The world, as a whole, is a system that is blind to our personal needs and unaware of our plans, needs and dreams. We try to work out how to best operate to fit in it so we can get something of what we hope to achieve, done.


It is a struggle that wears us down. In the end we find it easier to just chug along blaming our lack of success to external factors we couldn’t control. The truth is that we can never really control factors outside our self. But we can control the way we respond to all of the difficulties we face. We can control whether we clearly formulate our ambitions and whether we adequately plan for what we want, and we can control how hard we work to achieve something because we truly feel we want it.

This deliberate, studied approach is what we mean by being intentional. Because it changes our perception it changes our reality. A changed reality offers different options to what we would normally see or have access to. Different options and opportunities change the outcomes we get from the actions we engage in.

It all sounds easy when it’s broken down like this. It is not. There is an energetic cost to this mode of behavior we need to be willing to accept. It’s a little like the saying “You have to be in it to win it”. Without an acceptance of the effort required we are unlikely to feel anything beyond the fatigue it generates. A focus on the personal cost to us will only keep us from reaching our goals. Raise your sights just a little, however. Feel, inside you, where you need to get to and understand why and then the effort involved appears immaterial.

Dreams can be achieved. Visions of success can be made true. But it needs an alignment of purpose and effort, inside us first. That starts with us being intentional, in our thoughts and in our deeds.  

 



David Amerland is a Chemical Engineer with an MSc. in quantum dynamics in laminar flow processes. He converted his knowledge of science and understanding of mathematics into a business writing career that’s helped him demystify, for his readers, the complexity of subjects such as search engine optimization (SEO), search marketing, social media, decision-making, communication and personal development. The diversity of the subjects is held together by the underlying fundamental of human behavior and the way this is expressed online and offline. Intentional: How to Live, Love, Work and Play Meaningfully is the latest addition to a thread that explores what to do in order to thrive. A lifelong martial arts practitioner, David Amerland is found punching and kicking sparring dummies and punch bags when he’s not behind his keyboard.

For More Information

Tuesday, November 2, 2021

Straight from the Author's Mouth with Faye Rapoport DesPres

Faye Rapoport DesPres is the author of the memoir-in-essays Message From a Blue Jay and the Stray Cat Stories Children’s Book Series. Faye earned her MFA from the Solstice Creative Writing Program at Pine Manor College and has published creative nonfiction, fiction, and poetry in a variety of literary journals. A lifelong advocate for animals, wildlife, and environmental protection, she donates a portion of the proceeds from her children’s books to non-profit animal rescue organizations. Faye lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts with her husband, Jean-Paul Des Pres, and their rescued cats.


INTERVIEW:

Thanks for letting us interrogate you!  Can you give us a go-for-the-gut answer as to why you wanted to be an author?


I honestly can’t explain “why.” Publishing a book was a dream I’d had since childhood, when I wrote poems and stories for myself and friends. Becoming a published writer just seemed like the natural dream to me, the hopeful result of working towards my potential.


Tell us (we won’t tell promise!) is it all it’s cracked up to be?  I mean what are the perks and what are the demands?


I would say it’s not exactly what it’s cracked up to be, if the image of being an author is seeing your books sell thousands or even millions of copies, making lots of money, and being asked to appear on popular talk shows. None of those things have happened to me. The “perks” include the satisfaction of knowing your work is entertaining your readers and/or inspiring others and getting the messages you’d like to express out into the world. Getting positive feedback about your writing and books also feels good. However, writing is very hard work, and writers face a lot of rejection on the path towards whatever their version of “success” looks like. Plus, there will inevitably be negative comments, reviews, and feedback to go with the positive, and that can feel like a kick in the gut. 


Which route did you take – traditional or self-published – and can you give us the nitty gritty low down on what’s that like? 


I took the traditional route. My first book, a personal essay collection or memoir-in-essays, was “shopped” by an agent to a variety of publishers, and like many writers I faced a lot of rejection on the road to getting some nice offers and eventually publishing with a lovely, small independent press (that I ended up connecting with on Twitter of all places). The connections I made with the first book helped me publish my children’s books with an imprint owned by the same publisher.


Tell us for real what your family feels about you spending so much time getting your book written, polished, edited, formatted, published, what have you?


My husband has always been supportive of the time and effort (and even, at times, financial investment) it takes to be a writer. Having a supportive partner is huge.


Do your pets actually get their food on time or do they have to wait until you type just one more word?


My pets get their food (and meds, and whatever else they need) before I do anything else. Rule #1.


Are your plants actually still alive?


Yes, they are!


In writing your book, how did you deal with the phone ringing, your family needing dinner or your boss calling you saying you’re late?


I usually write early in the morning before anyone (except my pets) has access to me. The Internet, however is a problem. It can be hugely distracting, so I’ve had to do everything from use software that shuts it down while I write to having a laptop that doesn’t connect to Wi-Fi. On the days when I don’t get away from the Internet, I’m much less productive as a writer.


What was the craziest or insane thing that happened to you in the book publishing process?


After working with an agent for months, a publisher I’d interacted with on Twitter asked to read my manuscript and then offered to publish it — and ended up being the one I chose.


How about the social networks?  Which ones do you believe help and which ones do you wish you could avoid?


I wish I could avoid them all at this point! However, as a writer, I feel it’s important to be “out there” and available/visible. I have found that Facebook pages and ads help publicize my books, although that might change somewhat as Facebook falls somewhat out of favor.


Book sales.  Don’t you just love them (or lack of?)?  How are you making the sales happen for you?


I love them when they happen. Making them happen isn’t easy! Like most authors, I do everything from being active and advertising on social media to doing readings and participating in panels or other literary or local events. For my first book, the publisher assisted a great deal with marketing. For the children’s books, I have had to do more on my own. Getting online reviews (if they’re positive!) is always helpful, but it’s hard asking readers to review. You have to do it, though.


What is one thing you’d like to jump on the rooftop and scream about?


Just one thing?


Okay, too much sugar for you today!  Here’s a nice cup of Chamomile tea and come on over and sit under the cabana and watch the waves roll in.  Now…can you tell us what you love about being a published author and how all those things above doesn’t matter because it’s all part of the whole scheme of things and you wouldn’t have it any other way?


I love getting an email from a reader who tells me my memoir made them feel less alone in the world. I love getting a photo of a grandmother, grandfather, or parent reading one of my children’s books to a smiling child. I love hearing that a child pulled on his or her parent’s hand and said they have to help a stray cat they’ve just spotted outdoors because they remember Little White (the subject of my first book). I love donating money to animal rescue organizations when my children’s books sell. Knowing you’ve touched people and made a difference makes all of the hard work, time, rejection, and negative feedback worth it.



Wednesday, October 27, 2021

Straight From the Mouth of Author Jennifer Chase

 

5 Things You Should Know About Pretty Broken Dolls


By Jennifer Chase

1.     


1. 
Pretty Broken Dolls revolves around Detective Katie Scott who heads up the cold case unit in Pine Valley, California. I'm fascinated with cold cases as well as the people who investigate them. Even though it's sad that these cases have remained unsolved for a couple of years and sometimes decades, I find that the men and women who persevere with the dedication to solve them to give closure to the families are true heroes.

*According to the US Department of Justice, there are approximately 250,000 cold cases in the US increasing by about 6,000 cases a year. There are close to 40,000 unsolved cold cases in California reported by the Murder Accountability Project, which compiles data from the FBI's Uniform Crime Report.

2.   2Okay, you've probably figured out by now reading any of the books in the Detective Katie Scott series is that I love dogs. Actually, I'm an animal lover and have been even before I could walk. But dogs have always been my go-to buddy. What I truly enjoy is dog training. They are amazing. I prefer active working type of dogs, like Labrador retrievers and German shepherds, which help keep me on my toes. I have trained in obedience, agility, scent and trailing, and dock diving. One of my dogs is trained in German commands just like K9 Cisco in the book.

3. 


 3
Pine Valley, California is a fictitious town in the Sierra Mountains. This book as well as the series takes advantage of the great outdoors, mountains, lakes, and the abundance of Pine trees. I love being outside so I incorporated it into my stories—and a few crime scenes. I feel it adds more character and macabre qualities increasing the interest in the investigation.

4.   4Ever since I went to my first carnival and fair, I've been infatuated with the Ferris wheel ride. Did you know that they were originally designed to be easily taken apart and put back together travelling from town to town? I have to say out of all the rides at the amusement park the expression on the faces of people on that ride is so animated—from wonder to pure joy, and some fear too. I had to incorporate this ride in Pretty Broken Dolls. You'll just have to read it to find out how I highlighted this fair favorite.

5.   5The character Deputy Sean McGaven is loosely based on someone I knew in a law enforcement agency in California and was a deputy sheriff when I met him—he later went on to other positions within the department.  Besides being a tall police officer, he had a great personality with a quick wit.

 


Jennifer Chase
 is a multi award-winning and USA Today BestSelling crime fiction author, as well as a consulting criminologist. Jennifer holds a bachelor’s degree in police forensics and a master’s degree in criminology & criminal justice. These academic pursuits developed out of her curiosity about the criminal mind as well as from her own experience with a violent psychopath, providing Jennifer with deep personal investment in every story she tells. In addition, she holds certifications in serial crime and criminal profiling.  She is an affiliate member of the International Association of Forensic Criminologists, and member of the International Thriller Writers

You can visit her website at www.authorjenniferchase.com or connect with her on TwitterGoodreads and Facebook.

Wednesday, October 20, 2021

Straight From the Mouth of Lindsay Lees, Author of 'The Willing'


Lindsay Lees
 is originally from Los Angeles and holds dual citizenship in the U.S. and the United Kingdom, and while growing up and later in college, she split her time between the two countries. Lindsay earned a B.A. in 2008 from Manchester Metropolitan University, and next an M.F.A.in Creative Writing from California College of the Arts. 

The Willing is Lindsay’s debut novel. She currently lives a quiet Southern life with her husband and a houseful of pets. 

Visit her website or connect with her at FACEBOOK and GOODREADS.


INTERVIEW


Thanks for letting us interrogate you!  Can you give us a go-for-the-gut answer as to why you wanted to be an author?

It was Toni Morrison who said, “Write the book you want to read.” That’s why I wanted to be


an author.

Tell us (we won’t tell promise!) is it all it’s cracked up to be?  I mean what are the perks and what are the demands?

I honestly don’t know if being a writer was a choice for me. Not when the choice is between not writing and living with the untold story taking up space in my head. The story had to come out otherwise it would have probably driven me mad. So yeah writing is definitely more than it’s cracked up to be. Especially when a story takes up so much of your mind and imagination. The perks of writing are self-satisfaction. Knowing that you’ve accomplished something that most people couldn’t begin to consider. The demands are on time and allowing yourself the opportunity to accomplish things at their own pace and not just the one your ego demands.

Which route did you take – traditional or self-published – and can you give us the nitty gritty low down on what’s that like?

After unsuccessfully attempting the traditional publishing route I decided to self-publish. I knew that my story deserved a chance at hitting the market. The path has been a long one because I wanted to ensure that the book as up to the standards of traditionally published work. I searched and vetted the best editor to work with and let that process happen organically from the delays to the numerous edits. It happened in its own time and I had to accept that it wasn’t going to just happen overnight.

What’s the snarkiest thing you can say about the publishing industry?

The publishing industry is subjective and bias but then again so are readers. Unfortunately there’s a lot of agenda pushing that occurs in society today and that is very apparent when it comes to the traditional publishing world.

Tell us for real what your family feels about you spending so much time getting your book written, polished, edited, formatted, published, what have you?

Fortunately I have a very supportive family and husband who have fully encouraged my dream to publish. They are inspired by my fortitude and impressed with what I’ve been able to do without the help of traditional publishers.

What was the craziest or insane thing that happened to you in the book publishing process?

Well it seems pretty obvious that Coronavirus was the craziest thing to happen to everyone and it also happened to coincide with the publication of my book. In some ways it afforded me the opportunity to focus without any distractions. It also opened up a lot of opportunity when it came to digital marketing and attracting readers who possibly had a lot more time to sit down and get into reading books again.

How about the social networks?  Which ones do you believe help and which ones do you wish you could avoid?

Social media is a fun, engaging and occasionally frustrating way to market and attract readers. It can sometimes feel like it’s more for show than substance. While certain sites like twitter can be seen as places where people just look for validation for their feelings and unfiltered thoughts without any meaning or purpose. I’d say that Instagram has the most engagement for writers and readers.

Book sales.  Don’t you just love them (or lack of?)?  How are you making the sales happen for you?

Book sales are tricky. Certainly the perk of being traditionally published is the benefit of being secured a spot in book stores and the support of an entire marketing team. I’m relying on blog tours at the minute to attract some readers.

What is one thing you’d like to jump on the rooftop and scream about?

You’ve never read a book like mine because nobody’s ever written one quite like this. It’s entertaining and infuriating but honest to it’s core. It will leave an impression whether you love it or hate it.

Okay, too much sugar for you today!  Here’s a nice cup of Chamomile tea and come on over and sit under the cabana and watch the waves roll in.  Now…can you tell us what you love about being a published author and how all those things above doesn’t matter because it’s all part of the whole scheme of things and you wouldn’t have it any other way?

I love the feeling of accomplishment. I did something that I’d been dreaming of doing for over a decade and finally made it a reality. I love knowing that my book is a tangible product now that I can hold and share with the world.


 THE WILLING is available at:


https://www.amazon.com/Secret-Baby-Second-Chance-Stillwater/dp/1335456252/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8